Social Protection

Following sessions of the Working Group “Social Protection” are scheduled to be presented at the 14th EADI General Conference:

ID Session name Date&Time Room
WGS191 Identifying the Impact of Social Protection I 24/06, 2.30pm S21
WGS193 Exploring the Political Economy of Social Protection I 24/06, 5pm S21
WGS192 Identifying the Impact of Social Protection II 25/06, 2.45pm S21
WGS194 Exploring the Political Economy of Social Protection II 26/06, 2.30pm S21

Extending social protection in low and middle income countries has gained prominence on the international development agenda. Likewise, social protection has been increasingly rooted during the last 20 years in national policy agendas in many low- and middle-income countries as well. Extension of coverage happens both in scope – by including previously excluded population groups – and in depth – by revising existing benefits. Ensuring financial access to health systems, establishing systems of old age protection and providing support to the poor and near-poor are among the core areas of political interest. Instruments are manifold covering mandatory and voluntary contributory social insurance schemes, tax-financed universal or targeted social transfers or micro-insurance and other group-based schemes.

The newly founded EADI Working Group on Social Protection will focus on two central themes at the EADI’s 14th General Conference in June 2014: (1) Assessing the contributions of social protection to social, economic and political development (consequences of change) and (2) analyzing the political economy of social protection reforms (causes of change).

Call for Papers – Working Group Session #1

Social Protection Call #1

The first Working Group Session will focus on the impacts of social protection. Although in general increasing empirical evidence is available on the impact of social protection regarding income poverty or health, less evidence exists on other social effects of social protection (education, inequality, access to water etc.) as well as on economic effects (investment in assets and human capital and income generating activities) and political effects (social capital, social cohesion, state stability).

Authors are invited to present papers on amongst others:

  • The relationship between social protection and risk-taking behavior and its impact on individuals’ or households’ savings, asset accumulation and investment decisions
  • Impact of social protection on social inclusion and cohesion.
  • Impact of social protection on developing or changing the social contract.
  • Impact of social protection on citizens’ social capital and political participation.

Call for Papers – Working Group Session #2

Social Protection Call #2

The second Working Group Session will address the political economy of social protection reforms. Not surprisingly, the characteristics of reform processes differ across countries both in terms of scope and speed of institutional change. Whereas in some countries reforms are directed at one particular pillar of social protection only (for instance social health protection or social assistance), other countries have – either simultaneously or gradually – initiated comprehensive reform processes encompassing multiple or even all pillars of social protection. In terms of speed some countries are continuously progressing on their reform paths, whereas in other countries reforms come to a halt or are even reversed.

Authors are invited to present papers on amongst others:

  • Impact of socioeconomic factors, political institutions, or prevailing societal norms and values on the political feasibility of reforms
  • Determinants of public support for or resistance against social protection reforms.
  • Impact of timing, sequencing, communication and other design modalities of reforms.
  • Assessment of reform complementarities to other reform areas.

Convenors: Katja Bender (International Centre for Sustainable Development, University of Applied Sciences Bonn-Rhein-Sieg), Esther Gehrke (German Development Institute, Bonn), Markus Loewe (German Development Institute, Bonn) and Esther Schüring (University of Applied Sciences Bonn-Rhein-Sieg).